Postdoc position available! Join the lab!

Post-doctoral position to work on ongoing projects including phylogenetics,
phylogenomics, and evolution. In particular, there are projects involving
work with the Open Tree of Life, phylogenetic dataset construction, large
phylogenetic analyses, phylogenomic analyses involving genomes and
transcriptomes, orthology and homology searching, analysis of differential
gene expression using phylogenies, large comparative analysis, and
evolution of plants.

Qualifications: A PhD, good publication record, and strong background in
phylogenetics. The candidate will preferably have skills in computational
work and computer programming.

Start date: The candidate can start as early as August 2016 (preferable).

Length of position: The position is for one year with review for a second
year and possible extension.

Salary: Commiserate with experience.

To apply: via email, send a CV, statement of research interests, and names
and contact information for three references. Applications and inquiries
should be addressed to Stephen Smith at eebsmith@umich.edu.

Looking for graduate students!

The Smith lab is looking for interested graduate students! If you want to work on plant evolution, evolution at a large scale, molecular evolution, computational and methodological phylogenetics, look no further! Send me an email and we can talk about projects, opportunities, and what it is like to be a graduate student here.

You can apply to the University of Michigan EEB program here and is the general department website.

About

I am Stephen A. Smith, an evolutionary biologist and Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. You can find out more information about the people in the lab here and the projects here. A lot of the research in the lab focuses on plant evolution, detecting and describing large scale patterns of evolution, examining differences in the rate of molecular evolution, and using new data sources like transcriptomes and genomes to address these questions. A great deal of this involves the development of new methods and new computational tools. My faculty page is here.